Kelly Jones offers to go on Infowars to talk with Alex Jones about their trial, or have him on her show.

Kelly Jones at the Driskill Hotel

 

Good day Austin:

At a press conference yesterday morning in the Chisholm Trail Room at the Driskill Hotel, Kelly Jones offered to go on her ex-husband, Alex Jones’ show Infowars, to talk about their child custody case. That trial recently ended with a jury verdict granting her the status of primary parent in the joint custody of their three children, meaning that for the first time since before their 2015 divorce, the children will live with her and visit their father, rather than the other way around.

Alternatively, she said, if he doesn’t want to have her on his show, he could come on her show.

“I’m available any time if Alex wants to have me on his show, or if he wants to come on my show that I’m going to launch, to talk about our case, and I reach out to him to do that and I hope we can join together for our children,” Kelly Jones said.

And what is her show?

“I’m going to be launching a podcast that I hope to broaden into radio,” she said. “It’s Split City Radio.”

Well, I suppose there would be some kind of odd justice if a court case that largely – although not entirely – kept the jury from hearing much from Alex Jones’ vast, varied and sometimes vitriolic body of work on Infowars – were somehow to find itself, post-trial, ultimately resolved, or at any rate replayed, on Infowars.

But, it seems highly unlikely to me that such an appearance – she on his show or he on her prospective show – could end happily.

And Alex Jones, conspiracy polemicist and sometime satirist (although it’s never entirely clear one ends and the other begins), seems far more interested not in some ex-spouse guest spot but in getting Stephen Colbert on his show or him getting on Colbert’s show, ever since Colbert, amid the publicity coming out of the custody trial, created a new Alex Jones character named Tuck Buckford.

Kelly Jones press conference yesterday, which she held with attorney Robert Hoffman of Houston, was in response to Alex Jones’ April 28 press conference in front of the Travis County Courthouse where the custody trail was held, on the day after the trial ended.

Each press conference was revealing.

Alex Jones’ press conference, which I wrote about in a previous First Reading, was the work of the performance artist that he says he sometimes is but that he says he often is not, as when he is sincerely revealing to the world the perfidious hidden workings of the global elite and the bunkum of the mainstream media.

That press conference was dynamic, outrageous, veering between seriousness and ridiculousness.

And yes, he obsessed a bit about Stephen Colbert, who built a career on portraying a lovably loathsome version of Bill O’Reilly, who is – or was – a kind of Walter Mitty Alex Jones.

At Alex Jones’ press conference, there was a lot of press, a lot of cameras, including Infowars’ own, which advertised its full viewing as a climactic takedown of the Mainstream Media.

Kelly Jones’ press conference was relatively sedate. It stayed on topic. And there were very little coverage.

Fortunately, KXAN was there and taped the whole press conference and you can watch it here

Here are some highlights.

 

 

Kelly Jones had reason to be exultant.

According to the jury’s verdict. she and Alex will continue to have joint custody of the children, but Kelly Jones, who had only very minimal access to her children the last couple of years, will be the primary parent with whom the children will live.

“I am so grateful our three amazing children are coming home,” she said.

Jones and her lawyers built their case on what is known as parental alienation – that Alex Jones had effectively brainwashed their children into turning against their mother in a sudden and unnatural way.

“I was forced into 100 hours of therapy – the equivalent of about 40 years of therapy – while the experts ignored Alex and gave him a broad pass to do whatever he wanted, including severely alienating the children,” Kelly Jones said.

From Hoffman:

Parental alienation really is counter intuitive. People think that if children reject a parent they are doing so because that parent has engaged in some serious conduct that’s caused the children to drift away, and really parental alienation is the opposite in which a parent uses undue influence on the children to cause the children to reject a parent, such as Ms. Jones, where there’s no valid reason to do so.

This was an amazing victory for so many reasons.

Number one, to have this incredible mother with a heart of gold and steel, if you will, fighting for her children against incredible odds.

Number two, against a very powerful man such as Alex Jones who was able to fight us on every single front with motions filed and efforts to keep her from having the kind of relationship with her kids that she deserved.

Number three, with some evidentiary rulings that came in during the course of the trial where Mr. Jones, Infowars, who he really was, was not something that the jury got to see very much of, and I think it would have had a tremendous impact if they had gotten to see that.

Maybe number four on the list was there was maybe 20 to 30 mental health professionals in the community that just got it wrong.

 

At the trial, Hoffman lived up to his reputation as a great “closer,” but he also gave deserved credit to co-counsel, Bobby Newman, a hyper-aggressive Houston divorce attorney, for his success in his badgering cross-examination of Alex Jones, that Hoffman said reduced Jones to “just a ball of stress and anger, if you will, which was the real Alex Jones that we wanted to show.”

“We’re very much looking forward to getting the children out of this environment, getting them the help that they need and having Mr. Jones understand what needs to be done to stop alienating these children, and then to give these kids two parents, which is what they are entitled to, which is what this case is about,” Hoffman said.

The remedy for parental alienation, Hoffman said, is placing the children in Kelly Jones’ care and cutting them off from all contact with their father for 90 days while they undergo some intensive family therapy and deprogramming with a group like Family Bridges, which Newman said has a 95 percent success rate.

Kelly Jones unveiled a new website that, like her prospective podcast/radio show, would focus on using her case to bring a broader understanding of the phenomenon of parental alienation.

 

 

 

Kelly Jones:

The jury has spoken and I am confident that Judge (Orlinda) Naranjo will move immediately and proactively to move the children into my custody and to protect them from further abuse. In doing this, Judge Naranjo can right many wrongs and become a hero for alienated children and their parents across America.

Alex has been hostile to me as recently as yesterday and the children need to come home. His press conference,  along with being fake news and being conducted in violation of court orders (Alex Jones cited sealed documents and spoke before a gag order was subsequently, and retroactively, lifted as of the end of the trial), was a documentation of the alienation tactics that he uses, as well as  an illustration of how he lied in courts.

I didn’t start this fight. Alex is a victim, but not of my actions or of the press, but rather of the greed of his own lawyers and court-appointed experts who preyed off his rage and amplified the conflict in order to profit off distress.

But Kelly Jones’ press conference optimism was short-lived. Not long after the press conference,  the lawyers in the case had a conference call with Judge Naranjo at 1:30, and afterward, Kelly Jones texted:

I learned after today’s press conference that my ex-husband will file a Motion to Set Aside the Jury Verdict with Judge Naranjo.  This filing of my ex-husband’s is a further illustration of his ongoing hostility and that his news conference was fake news. 

He is upset about losing the Jury trial, and rather than do what is best for the children and facilitate a quick solution for them, he is fighting to keep me and the children in ongoing litigation and to undo in its entirety the jury verdict he acted as if was not significantly against him.

Clearly his strong effort to delay Judge Naranjo’s implementation of the jury verdict and to set it aside makes clear it was a very major jury decision against him and in the favor of our children living with me primarily.

Sadly, due to the alleged schedule of Alex’s attorneys, a hearing on the implementation of the jury verdict, including possession and access,won’t occur until until May 30, 2017. 

I’m concerned that the children will not have the swift resolution this kind of serious alienation situation, a situation of abuse, calls for.

I believe  that when Judge Naranjo rules, she will do so acknowledging the Jury’s mandate and according to the Texas Family Code and the best interests of my children including appropriate treatment for alienated children.

Kelly Jones worries that her ex-husband has the virtually limitless resources to press the case, to challenge the jury’s verdict, and she doesn’t.

(Note: I’d love to talk to any of the jurors in the case, individually or collectively, about how you came to your verdict. I’m at jtilove@statesman.com.)

Meanwhile, the Alex Jones of Infowars continues his breakneck pace reporting on everything from the terrible triumph of the globalists in France, to his crusade against vaccinations, to designing the equivalent of the Nike swoosh “to illustrate humankind transcending the synthetic VR being pulled over our collective souls!”

And, like that.

 

 

 

But, not to be lost amid all the substance, there was this intriguing piece clearly labeled with a “satire alert” for the benefit of the mainstream media and the otherwise dull-witted.

By way of background, from Mack Lamoureux at Vice back in March, Digging Deep Into the Only Conspiracy Alex Jones Doesn’t Like:

Bill Hicks was the angry voice of reason for the disenfranchised and foul mouthed street criminals of his time—he was the man who smoked in the face of cancer. If you don’t know who Bill Hicks was, do yourself a favour, click into a new tab, Google the comedian, and watch everything he ever did as the man was a savant imo (then come back and read the rest of this article, please.)

Sadly though, the world only got to listen to his ramblings for a mere 16-years as he died from pancreatic cancer in 1994 at the young age of 32, however, in his short time above ground Hicks proved to be one of the most influential comics of all time. And as with any well known person who dies young—especially a controversial one—rumours have run rampant following his death.

In the case of Hicks’ death, none of those rumours are more prolific, and bizarre, than the notion that Hicks faked his death to become conspiracy monger Alex Jones. A quick Google search will bring you to hundreds of blog posts on the topic and self made videos crowd youtube as theorist attempt to further the conspiracy. While it’s truly an intense amount of crazy, the idea has lived on the internet so long that—apart from the true believers—it has become an in-joke for redditors, channers, and a rogue crew of Alex Jones fans (potato-men?).

Most importantly though, this conspiracy seems to really f****ing annoy Alex Jones—a 9/11 truther who has spread the notion that the kids killed in Sandy Hook were actors and the Quebec mosque shooting was a false flag attack.

“I’m sick of hearing about Bill Hicks,” lamented Jones on a recent appearance on the Joe Rogan Experience. “It hurts me that they’re so dumb, they don’t know I’m my own person, Alex Jones.”

Well, either Vice took Alex Jones seriously when it shouldn’t have, or he has gotten over his Bill Hicks pique, in this satire alert piece in which he acknowledges he really is Bill Hicks.

Yes I am Bill Hicks. But to be perfectly accurate, you didn’t get it all. You didn’t get the full conspiracy – I played the character Bill Hicks.

Then I decided to bring forward an even more incredible persona – that of Alex Jones.

Here’s where the rest of the story comes in. For 20 years I’ve been Alex Jones, since we staged my death in the early 1990s. 

The truth is that Bill Hicks himself never existed and now I am going to reveal my true identity.

After close to 35 years of fake persona of one type or another, I am going to revert to my true self, raised in London England, I am David Mentalson.

To be quite clear, David Mentalson III.

All that’s missing is for Alex Jones to rip off his face mask and reveal himself to be Andy Kaufman.

And why not?

But Jones’ take on an effete Brit as David Mentalson III, brought to mind his encounter with some real Britishers a few years back that was recently called to my attention by Jennifer Mercieca, a professor of communication at Texas A&M, who has been giving Jones a little scrutiny for her book on the demagoguery of Donald Trump.

Here’s the telling preface on the post from Stuart Wright, who posted the clip on his YouTube channel.

Published on Jun 9, 2013
He’s been invited on to talk about the Bilderberg Meetings ‘conspiracy’.
Andrew Neil hasn’t had anyone on the show quite as idiotic as Alex Jones, and Neil lets him know.
Both Neil and David Aaronovitch are laughing at Jones for the lune that he obviously makes himself out to be.
Even the ‘political guests’ are tweeting away like mad 🙂
But look at the little smirk he gives at 43 seconds in. I don’t think he’s interested in anything but promoting himself and his website and making money of this ranting, paranoid character he portrays.

Reader Comments 0

0 comments