Pull-ups, pistols and putting $10,000 on the table: a few other ways presidential candidates challenge each other

Are you ready for Rick Perry’s pull-up contest with Donald Trump?rick-perry-versus-trump

That’s right: Perry’s latest message to Trump following a month-long war of words was to see who is physically the toughest.

“Let’s get a pull-up bar out there and let’s see who can do the most pull-ups,” the former Texas governor and Air Force Captain said after a speech Wednesday at the Yale Club in New York.

Related: Perry versus Trump: The 2016
presidential race turns to social media trolling

As far as we can tell, it’s the first recorded pull-up contest in presidential campaign history.

Just for fun, here are a few other ways that candidates have challenged each other that’s almost entirely devoid of ideology, experience and other widely accepted political criteria:

With thousands of dollars

In a 2011 debate, Mitt Romney famously bet Rick Perry $10,000 to settle an argument over Romney’s alleged support of individual mandates for health insurance while serving as governor of Massachusetts.

With cookies

Technically, the presidents aren’t facing off with cookies — their wives are. The results of Family Circle’s Presidential Bake-Off, in which First Lady hopefuls put their best cookie recipes to a vote in a poll put on by the magazine, have reflected the results of all but one presidential election since 1992. Current First Lady Michelle Obama won in 2012 with a recipe that called for both white and dark chocolate chips.

Related: 2016 presidential campaign swag-off swings into gear

With pistols

In 1804, a political challenge between former Vice President Aaron Burr and former Treasury secretary Alexander Hamilton, involved not pull-ups, but 19th-century bullets. The duel, a culmination of a 15-year political rivalry, ended in Hamilton’s death and Burr’s career’s end. At the time, a duel was considered an “affair of honor.”

With ESPN brackets

Earlier this year, ESPN reached out to likely 2016 presidential candidates and asked them to fill out an ESPN bracket for the NCAA basketball tournament. Of the 14 who entered, Scott Walker’s bracket did best.

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